The Healing Power of Burdock

The Healing Powers of Burdock from

Burdock has been used by herbalists worldwide to treat a variety of skin diseases such as abscesses, acne, carbuncles, psoriasis and eczema. Burdock can be either taken alone or combined with other remedies, such as Yellow Dock and Sarsaparilla. The beneficial effects of this herb include increasing circulation to the skin, helping to detoxify the epidermal tissues. Burdock Root has been reported to destroy bacteria and fungus cultures. It is a popular detoxifying agent that produces a diuretic effect on the body which aids the filtering of impurities from the bloodstream. By promoting perspiration, Burdock Root eliminates toxins through the skin. By producing a detoxifying effect, Burdock Root aids blood circulation and produces a variety of positive side effects. As mentioned before it contains inulin, a carbohydrate that strengthens the liver. The high concentration of inulin and mucilage aids in the soothing effects on the gastrointestinal tract. The high concentration of inulin is helpful for individuals that are afflicted with diabetes and hypoglycemia as it provides helpful sugar that does not provoke rapid insulin production. Inulin, which is very high in Burdock, is a resinoid or camphor-like hydrocarbon that is aromatic, stimulant, expectorant, tonic, stomachic, and antiseptic. Burdock Root contains polyacetylenes that gives the herb its antibacterial and antifungal properties. It is used as a mild laxative that aids in the elimination of uric acid or gout. It is classified as an alterative, diuretic and diaphoretic. It helps the kidneys to filter out impurities from the blood very quickly. It clears congestion in respiratory, lymphatic, urinary and circulatory systems. Burdock releases water retention, stimulates digestion, aids kidney, liver and gallbladder function. It also functions as an aperient, depurative, and antiscorbutic. Decoctions of Burdock have also been historically used for soothing the kidneys, relieving the lymphatic system, rheumatism, gout, GI tract disorders, stomach ailments, constipation, catarrh, fever, infection, fluid retention and skin problems. An article in Chemotherapy identified the chemical arctigenin contained in Burdock as an “inhibitor of experimental tumor growth.” Both European and Chinese herbalists have long considered burdock root’s “lightly warming, moistening effect an excellent tonic for the lungs and liver. It reportedly stimulates toxic waste through the skin and urine, improving digestion and is good for arthritis and rheumatism. Burdock is an aid to circulation because of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. A recent study showed that Burdock blocked dangerous chemicals from causing damage to cells, suggesting to the possibility that burdock may help decrease the risk of developing cancer from toxic chemicals. Some other miscellaneous disorders Burdock Root is good for are: Helpful in cellular regeneration Useful in cleansing and treatment of Crohn’s disease and diverticulitis Aids in alleviating distress related to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Useful in the treatment of recovery from Hepatitis Burdock stimulates the appetite, so modern experts recommend it for anorexia nervosa Burdock is useful for most of the same needs as Yellow Dock (rumex crispus) and is effective in treating gout and high cholesterol. Based on many studies with animals exposed to toxic chemicals, the tea very effectively protects the body against cellular damage and abnormal growths. The tea also has powerful anti-inflammatory activity based on studies and reduces liver damage from toxic chemicals. As a mildly bitter-tasting herb, it increases saliva and bile secretion, which aids digestion and cleanses the liver. Burdock root tea can also be applied externally for treating skin conditions. Despite Burdock’s reputation as a noxious weed, it is the source of several very palatable foods. Edible components of the Burdock plant are its roots, seeds, and its young stems. Young stalks are boiled to be eaten like asparagus, raw stems and young leaves are eaten in salads. Both the root and leaves are used in herbal remedies, but most recipes call for the root which has a sweetish and mucilaginous taste. Fresh burdock root also has a distinct aroma. It has been used, after chopping and roasting, as a coffee substitute.

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by Staff