Cilantro — the natural chelator by Dr. David G. Williams

Copyright (C) 1998 Mountain Home Publishing. Used with permission.

Image result for dr. david g williamsThere’s nothing I like more than learning about inexpensive, common herbs or spices that exhibit unusual healing properties. Historically, the use of herbs and spices in cooking evolved as a method to preserve foods and make them safer to store and eat. We’ve grown accustomed to using these items to enhance or accentuate the flavors of food, but researchers continue to discover herbs have much more to offer than just good taste. Cilantro is such an herb and one of its medicinal benefits was uncovered through the work of Dr. Yoshiaki Omura.

Dr. Omura treated several patients for an eye infection called trachoma (granular conjunctivitis), which is caused by the micro-organism Chlamydia trachomatis. Following the standard treatment, Dr. Omura found that the patients’ symptoms would initially clear up, only to recur within a few months. He experienced similar difficulties in treating viral-related problems like herpes simplex types I & II and cytomegalovirus infections.

After taking a closer look, Dr. Omura found these organisms seemed to hide and flourish in areas of the body where there were concentrations of heavy metals like mercury, lead, and aluminum. Somehow the organisms were able to use the toxic metals to protect themselves from the medicine. While he was testing for these toxic metals, Dr. Omura discovered that the leaves of the coriander plant (cilantro) could accelerate the excretion of mercury, lead, and aluminum from the body.

cilantroThis came about accidentally when he noticed that mercury levels in urine increased after an individual consumed Vietnamese soup. The healthy soup contained coriander, or, as it is better known in this country, cilantro. And when cilantro was used concurrently with natural antiviral or antibiotic agents and/or omega-3 fatty acids, the infections could be eliminated for good.

Dr. Omura’s discovery resulted in a novel technique, which greatly increased the body’s ability to clear up recurring infections, both viral and bacterial. By chance, he also discovered an inexpensive, easy way to remove — or chelate — toxic metals from the nervous system and body tissues. Chelation therapy using chemical agents like EDTA has long been used to help remove heavy metals, but cilantro is the only natural substance I’m aware of that has demonstrated this ability.

I highly recommend you take advantage of this “poor man’s chelation treatment.” All it takes is adding a quantity of cilantro to your diet daily, for two or three weeks. You can add a handful of fresh cilantro to a salad, mix a couple of teaspoons of cilantro pesto with whole wheat pasta, spread the pesto on toasted Italian bread, or have it with your favorite fish (good in soups). Any of these dishes will give you the dosages Dr. Omura used in his research.

Cilantro Pesto 1 clove garlic ½ cup almonds, cashews, or other nuts 1 cup packed fresh cilantro leaves 2 tablespoons lemon juice 6 tablespoons olive or flaxseed oil sea salt to taste

Put the cilantro and oil in blender and process until the cilantro is chopped. Add the rest of the ingredients and process to a lumpy paste. (You may need to add a touch of hot water and scrape the sides of the blender.) You can change the consistency by altering the amount of olive oil and lemon juice, but keep the 3:1 ratio of oil to juice. (It freezes well, so you can make several batches at once.)

For more information, please visit www.drdavidwilliams.com

Dr. David Williams: Clinician, Researcher, World Traveler, Entrepreneur, Author, and Publisher

 


An Autumn Menu by Nancy Mehagian

Around this Thanksgiving holiday, cook and cuisine author, Nancy Mehagian shares a favorite and easy recipe for organic turkey meatloaf.The leaves of fall are upon us, and on our streets and yards. If you live on the East Coast, your trees may be bare by now. Here, in Southern California, we’re still raking and blowing. I love it! Fall just might be my favorite season, for all the color that abounds, the changes in the air and the sight of some of my favorite produce at the Farmer’s Market. To celebrate the season, I’ve offered a few of my recipes–the ones that taste best eaten around a blazing fire.

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The Many Healing Qualities of Lion’s Mane Mushrooms

Are you familiar with Lion’s Mane Mushrooms? They have become the hot item for healthy eating. Vegetarians love them for their high protein content, while doctors and naturopaths go to them for their many healing qualities. Known by a variety of different names, such as bearded tooth mushroom, satyr’s beard, hedgehog mushroom, pom pom mushroom, or yamabushitake – the mushroom is often used as a meat substitute, since many say that they taste like shrimp or lobster when properly cooked.

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Japanese Pumpkin Side Dish by Nancy Mehagian

| by Nancy Mehagian

It’s the season for sweets, including pumpkin pie, but professional cook, Nancy Mehagian shares a side dish recipe for Japanese pumpkin that’s fast, healthy and delicious. Nancy has been a massage therapist and Jin Shin Jyutsu practitioner in Los Angeles for nearly 30 years. She is the author of the culinary memoir, “Siren’s Feast, an Edible Odyssey”.

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Moringa: the new superfood

| by Cheryl Shainmark

Moringa (Moringa oleifera) is the latest, hottest craze in superfoods. It’s been touted on Dr. Oz, written up on WebMD and The Huffington Post, and featured in several health newsletters. The leaves, fruits and bark of this tree can be taken as a powder or a tea, and often offer the best nutritional supplement available in the Southeast Asian and African countries where it is grown. With 9 times the protein of yogurt, 10 times the vitamin A of carrots,15 times the potassium of bananas, 17 times the calcium of milk, 12 times the vitamin C of oranges and 25 times the iron of spinach, Moringa has long been known as an Ayurvedic treatment, used to treat and prevent diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, anemia, arthritis, liver disease, and respiratory, skin, and digestive disorders.

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Screamin’ Greens by Nancy Mehangian

| by Nancy Mehangian

A perfect accompaniment to any dish, I call my greens “nutritional dynamite.” For this dish, I prefer black kale, red Russian kale or collard greens. Feel free to mix and match. 2 bunches greens, washed well, chopped and steamed until tender. (If you don’t already own a stainless steel steamer basket, please buy this essential kitchen item.)

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Nettles! by Patricia Neill

| by Patricia Neill

“Wood nettles like to grow by forest streams or rivers. Stinging nettles prefer sunny areas. If you have a creek or stream or river near you, look along the banks for nettles. If you get stung by the nettles, jewelweed is usually growing nearby. Cut the stem of the jewelweed and it will ease the nettles sting. So do dock and plantain leaves. Stick some plantain in your pocket before heading out to gather nettles. “

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The Healing Benefits of Bone Broth

The Healing Benefits of Bone Broth from Dr. Joseph Mercola, at www.mercola.com . People have known for centuries that bone broth is good for you: it helps heal your gut and aids digestion, it inhibits infection and reduces joint pain and inflammation. Dr. Mercola writes, “According to an old South American proverb, ‘good broth will resurrect the dead.’ While that’s undoubtedly an exaggeration, it speaks to the value placed on this wholesome food, going back through the annals of time.”

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Ayurvedic Dairy Free Diets by Charlotte Jernigan

| by Charlotte Jernigan

“Ayurveda discourages consumption of dairy products for those who are allergic to them and those with aggravated KAPHA DOSHA (body chemistry) and the associated imbalances of phlegm in the stomach or lungs, sinitus, asthma, cold, cough, flu, lymphatic congestion, edema, fibro-cystic breasts, cystic ovaries, etc. For ALL, dairy intake should be avoided or reduced during cloudy, rainy or snowy weather, or after the sun has set, when the following “TAMASIC” qualities are dominant in the environment: cool, damp, dark, still, quiet, slow or stagnant.”

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Health Benefits of Coconut Oil by Kiran Patil

“The health benefits of coconut oil include hair care, skin care, stress relief, maintaining cholesterol levels, weight loss, increased immunity, proper digestion and metabolism, relief from kidney problems, heart diseases, high blood pressure, diabetes , HIV and cancer , dental care, and bone strength. These benefits of coconut oil can be attributed to the presence of lauric acid, capric acid and caprylic acid, and its properties such as antimicrobial, antioxidant, antifungal, antibacterial, soothing, etc.” Recently, the health benefits of coconut oil was addressed in the New York Times. Read inside for the link to the article!

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