Is There an ‘All Natural’ Alternative to Antibiotics? by Susun Weed

Is There an ‘All Natural’ Alternative to Antibiotics?

There are good reasons to use antibiotic drugs. That said, most physicians and healthcare professionals agree that they are often overused. The overuse of antibiotics has created “superbugs” that are immune to the most common antibiotics. But on a more personal level, antibiotics can wreak havoc on your own immune system and gastrointestinal tract. The good news is that there is an all-natural alternative to antibiotics that I’ve found to be very effective.

 

If your infection is not life threatening, you may wish to try herbs instead of, or in addition to, regular antibiotics. Of the most-often used herbal anti-infectives–calendula, chaparral, echinacea, goldenseal, myrrh, poke, usnea, and yarrow–it is the lovely purple coneflower, echinacea, that I most often turn to. I find echinacea as effective as antibiotics (dare I say sometime better than!) if E. angustifolia/augustifolia – but not E. purpurea – is used when you make your own tincture; tincture, not capsules or teas, is used; the root, and only the root, is used; and very large doses are taken very frequently.

 

To figure your dose of echinacea, divide your body weight by 2; take that many drops per dose. There are about 25 drops in a dropperful; round up to full droppers. For example, if you weigh 180 pounds, take 90 drops/4 dropperfuls. There is no known overdose of echinacea tincture. With acute infection, I take a full dose every 2—3 hours. When the infection is chronic, I take a full dose every 4—6 hours. Many infections can be countered by echinacea alone. But, when there is a deeply entrenched infection in the pelvic area, for example, I add one dropperful of poke root tincture to my one- ounce bottle of Echinacea. Poke is an especially effective ally for men with prostatitis, women with chronic bacterial vaginal infections or PID, and anyone dealing with an STD/STI or urinary tract infection (UTI). There are many good-quality vendors who sell echinacea root. To make your make your own echinacea antibiotic tincture: Put 4 ounces, or 115 grams, of echinacea cut root in a quart jar. Fill the jar to the top with 100-proof vodka. Cap tightly, and be sure to label it and keep it safely out of children’s reach. Wait at least 6 weeks before use. This tincture is even more potent after 1 year.

c. 2011, Susun Weed

With kind permission, from the Wise Woman Herbal Ezine

Visit Susun Weed at: www.susunweed.com and wisewomanbookshop.com


Dr Mercola: Using Aloe Juice to Treat Heartburn

| by Merlian News

In a recent article, Dr. Mercola writes, “An estimated 15 to 20 million Americans use acid inhibiting drugs to treat heartburn. Indeed, PPIs are among the most widely prescribed drugs today, with annual sales of about $14 billion. This despite the fact that they were never intended to treat heartburn in the first place. Research clearly shows that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are severely overprescribed and misused, and do far more harm than good in the long run.”

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How to Block Nearly All the Mercury in Your Diet by Mike Adams

| by Mike Adams

How to block nearly all the mercury in your diet using common, everyday foods: from www.naturalnews.com, Mike Adams writes: As part of my ongoing scientific research into heavy metals, elemental retention and metals capturing ( see explanatory videos here), I have identified and documented anti-heavy-metals substances which have a remarkable natural affinity for binding with and “capturing” heavy metals. Why is this important? Because much of the “scientific” community today is actually corporate-driven junk science that’s trying to poison you with mercury in vaccines, mercury in dental fillings, heavy metals in fluoride, GMOs, pesticides and more.

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Starting Seeds Indoors for Spring Planting

| by Priscilla Warhowsky

Who doesn’t love to walk into the garden and pick a summer ripened juicy tomato to eat off the vine or slice up later with basil and olive oil? It’s almost a rite of summer for gardeners. Many summer vegetables that love heat such as tomatoes, eggplant, and peppers can be started indoors as seeds in late March to mid April to get a head start on the season. Starting seeds indoors is easy, fun, and you get to watch your creation from seed to plant to your dinner plate….

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Dandelions May Help Beat Cancer

Dandelion, both leaves and roots, whether grown wild or cultivated, is full of medicinal benefits. The greens can be chopped into salad, cooked like spinach, or added to juicing, while the root form can be used to make an infusion/tea or extract. Pamela Ovadje, a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Windsor, has done extensive work in investigating the anti-cancer properties of dandelions and other natural extracts. She found that an extract of dandelions can cause apoptosis, or cell death, among cancerous cells while not harming the healthy ones.

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Cooking With Qi & Conquering Any Disease

| by Merryn Jose

Like so many of us, I’ve been watching my nutrition and eating healthfully for years, buying only organic food and the very freshest ingredients possible. Also years ago, I cut out those foods that are known to damage our systems. I thought I was doing well until I heard about Qigong Master Jeff Primack and his food based healing system.

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Eating for Beauty by David Wolfe

Eating For Beauty is a well illustrated, delightful easy to read book, by David Wolfe-a raw food enthusiast. You can literally eat yourself beautiful to wonderfully exotic recipes for skin-glow, hair-building, nails, bone strengthening and much more. This book is filled with information about the importance of good nutrition. There are clear explanations on exactly what zinc, iron, chromium, manganese and certain minerals do for the body and which foods supply these nutrients.’

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The Benefits of Stinging Nettles

Urtica dioica, often called common nettle, stinging nettle or nettle leaf, is a herbaceous perennial flowering plant in the family Urticaceae. It is native to Europe, Asia, northern Africa, and western North America, and introduced elsewhere. There are more than 500 types of nettle worldwide. Used since ancient times, stinging nettles are used to thin and purify the blood, to relieve chest congestion, as a diuretic, and to stimulate the digestive system.

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The Health Benefits of Broccoli by The World’s Healthiest Foods.org

| by www.whfoods.com

Broccoli is a particularly rich source of a flavonoid called kaempferol. Recent research has shown the ability of kaempferol to lessen the impact of allergy-related substances on our body. The kaempferol connection helps to explain the unique anti-inflammatory benefits of broccoli, and it should also open the door to future research on the benefits of broccoli for a hypoallergenic diet.

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David Young: Farmer and Beekeeper in New Orlean’s 9th Ward

David Young, a retired police chief from Indiana, first came to New Orleans in 2010 for a visit. Responding to what he called, “A calling from God,” he stayed. Drawn to the desolate landscape of the Ninth Ward, still heavily damaged from hurricane Katrina, Young started his first garden in one of the vacant abandoned lots there. Now that garden hosts bees, goats, chickens, and a koi pond, as well as helping to feed the neighborhood. One lot let to another, and now Young has over 30 gardens and orchards and 60 beehives. Sensing a need in a community where the closest grocery store is miles away, Young distributes the food for free or at very low cost.

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