Dandelions May Help Beat Cancer

Dandelion, both leaves and roots, whether grown wild or cultivated, is full of medicinal benefits. The greens can be chopped into salad, cooked like spinach, or added to juicing, while the root form can be used to make an infusion/tea or extract.  Pamela Ovadje, a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Windsor, has done extensive work in investigating the anti-cancer properties of dandelions and other natural extracts. She found that an extract of dandelions can cause apoptosis, or cell death, among cancerous cells while not harming the healthy ones.

David Wolfe wrote about this, “In February 2015, the extract was approved for human trials. Currently, dandelion root extract is in Phase 1 trials for end-stage blood-related cancers including lymphoma and leukemia. Dr. Siyaram Pandey (video), professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of Windsor and principal research investigator for the project, believes dandelion root extract has “good potential” to kill cancer cells in the human body.” He added that cancerous cells begin “committing suicide” within 24 hours of introducing dandelion extract into the body.

In addition to its possible use for cancer treatment, there are other benefits as seen on the Anticancer Club website. Dandelions:

  • Stimulate digestive function through its bitter qualities and increased bile flow
  • Support key organs of detoxification such as the kidneys, liver and stomach
  • Act as a diuretic and natural laxative
  • Are anti-inflammatory
  • Anti-viral
  • Anti-rheumatic
  • Regulate blood sugar levels
  • Anti-oxidant: one cup has a whooping amount of carotenoid that matches almost a daily requirement of the vital Vitamin A and nearly a third of a daily dose of Vitamin C
  • Have twice the amount of calcium and iron of broccoli
  • High in potassium, an important electrolyte that helps regulate sodium levels and the acid-alkaline balance in the body
  • High amount of inulin, an indigestible carbohydrate that feeds healthy gut bacteria

Cooking With Qi & Conquering Any Disease

| by Merryn Jose

Like so many of us, I’ve been watching my nutrition and eating healthfully for years, buying only organic food and the very freshest ingredients possible. Also years ago, I cut out those foods that are known to damage our systems. I thought I was doing well until I heard about Qigong Master Jeff Primack and his food based healing system.

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Eating For Beauty is a well illustrated, delightful easy to read book, by David Wolfe-a raw food enthusiast. You can literally eat yourself beautiful to wonderfully exotic recipes for skin-glow, hair-building, nails, bone strengthening and much more. This book is filled with information about the importance of good nutrition. There are clear explanations on exactly what zinc, iron, chromium, manganese and certain minerals do for the body and which foods supply these nutrients.’

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The Benefits of Stinging Nettles

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The Health Benefits of Broccoli by The World’s Healthiest Foods.org

| by www.whfoods.com

Broccoli is a particularly rich source of a flavonoid called kaempferol. Recent research has shown the ability of kaempferol to lessen the impact of allergy-related substances on our body. The kaempferol connection helps to explain the unique anti-inflammatory benefits of broccoli, and it should also open the door to future research on the benefits of broccoli for a hypoallergenic diet.

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David Young: Farmer and Beekeeper in New Orlean’s 9th Ward

David Young, a retired police chief from Indiana, first came to New Orleans in 2010 for a visit. Responding to what he called, “A calling from God,” he stayed. Drawn to the desolate landscape of the Ninth Ward, still heavily damaged from hurricane Katrina, Young started his first garden in one of the vacant abandoned lots there. Now that garden hosts bees, goats, chickens, and a koi pond, as well as helping to feed the neighborhood. One lot let to another, and now Young has over 30 gardens and orchards and 60 beehives. Sensing a need in a community where the closest grocery store is miles away, Young distributes the food for free or at very low cost.

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3 Delicious, Detoxifying, Bone-Building Herbs by Vivian Goldschmidt, MA

Today we’re going to take an in-depth look at the bone health, overall health, and detoxification properties of three flavorful easy-to-find herbs. I also give you a scrumptious recipe to get you started. Fortunately, as you’ll soon see, detoxification can be a pleasant — even delicious — experience! I’d like to start with a decorative herb that more often than not gets ignored. Don’t overlook the.… from www.saveourbones.com

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The List of Benefits of Curcumin Keeps Growing

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Cilantro — the natural chelator by Dr. David G. Williams

| by Dr. David G. Williams

There’s nothing I like more than learning about inexpensive, common herbs or spices that exhibit unusual healing properties. Historically, the use of herbs and spices in cooking evolved as a method to preserve foods and make them safer to store and eat. We’ve grown accustomed to using these items to enhance or accentuate the flavors of food, but researchers continue to discover herbs have much more to offer than just good taste. Cilantro is such an herb and one of its medicinal benefits was uncovered through the work of Dr. Yoshiaki Omura.”

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