Moringa: the new superfood

Moringa (Moringa oleifera) is the latest, hottest craze in superfoods. It’s been touted on Dr. Oz, written up on WebMD  and The Huffington Post, and featured in several health newsletters. The leaves, fruits and bark of this tree can be taken as a powder or a tea, and often offer the best nutritional supplement available in the Southeast Asian and African countries where it is grown.

moringaLast year Dr. Mercola wrote about the benefits of moringa:

  • A Rich Nutritional Profile – 9 times the protein of yogurt, 10 times the vitamin A of carrots,15 times the potassium of bananas, 17 times the calcium of milk, 12 times the vitamin C of oranges and 25 times the iron of spinach
  • Antioxidants Galore – extracts of both mature and tender leaves exhibit strong antioxidant activity against free radicals, prevent oxidative damage to major biomolecules, and give significant protection against oxidative damage.
  • Lower Blood Sugar Levels – Moringa appears to have anti-diabetic effects, likely due to beneficial plant compounds contained in the leaves, including isothiocyanates.
  • Reduce Inflammation – The tree’s strong anti-inflammatory action is traditionally used to treat stomach ulcers. Moringa oil (sometimes called Ben oil) has been shown to protect the liver from chronic inflammation. The oil is unique in that, unlike most vegetable oils, moringa resists rancidity.
  • Maintain Healthy Cholesterol Levels -Moringa also has cholesterol-lowering properties, and one animal study found its effects were comparable to those of the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin.
  • Protect Against Arsenic Toxicity – The leaves and seeds of moringa may protect against some of the effects of arsenic toxicity, which is especially important in light of news that common staple foods, such as rice, may be contaminated.

Long known as an Ayurvedic treatment, it has been used to treat and prevent diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, anemia, arthritis, liver disease, and respiratory, skin, and digestive disorders. wrote: “Moringa contains high concentrations of polyphenols in its leaves and flowers that protect the liver against oxidation, toxicity, and damage. Moringa can reduce liver damage and fibrosis and reverse oxidation in the liver. Moringa oil can also restore liver enzymes to normal levels, reducing oxidative stress, and increasing protein content in the liver.”


Screamin’ Greens by Nancy Mehangian

| by Nancy Mehangian

A perfect accompaniment to any dish, I call my greens “nutritional dynamite.” For this dish, I prefer black kale, red Russian kale or collard greens. Feel free to mix and match. 2 bunches greens, washed well, chopped and steamed until tender. (If you don’t already own a stainless steel steamer basket, please buy this essential kitchen item.)

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Nettles! by Patricia Neill

| by Patricia Neill

“Wood nettles like to grow by forest streams or rivers. Stinging nettles prefer sunny areas. If you have a creek or stream or river near you, look along the banks for nettles. If you get stung by the nettles, jewelweed is usually growing nearby. Cut the stem of the jewelweed and it will ease the nettles sting. So do dock and plantain leaves. Stick some plantain in your pocket before heading out to gather nettles. “

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The Healing Benefits of Bone Broth from Dr. Joseph Mercola, at . People have known for centuries that bone broth is good for you: it helps heal your gut and aids digestion, it inhibits infection and reduces joint pain and inflammation. Dr. Mercola writes, “According to an old South American proverb, ‘good broth will resurrect the dead.’ While that’s undoubtedly an exaggeration, it speaks to the value placed on this wholesome food, going back through the annals of time.”

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Ayurvedic Dairy Free Diets by Charlotte Jernigan

| by Charlotte Jernigan

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42 Flowers You Can Eat by Melissa Breyer

| by Melissa Breyer, Writer / Brooklyn, New York

“The culinary use of flowers dates back thousands of years to the Chinese, Greek and Romans. Many cultures use flowers in their traditional cooking – think of squash blossoms in Italian food and rose petals in Indian food. Adding flowers to your food can be a nice way to add color, flavor and a little whimsy. Some are spicy, and some herbacious, while others are floral and fragrant. The range is surprising… It’s not uncommon to see flower petals used in salads, teas, and as garnish for desserts, but they inspire creative uses as well – roll spicy ones (like chive blossoms) into handmade pasta dough, incorporate floral ones into homemade ice cream… use them to make a floral simple syrup for use in lemonade or cocktails.

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Meet Ron Finley, the “Gangsta” Gardener

| by Staff

Why does Ron Finley, the “gangsta’ gardener,” say that the drive-throughs are killing more people than the drive-bys? Inner city communities often have little or no access to healthy food. As a result, people who live in these “food deserts” have extremely high rates of cancer, diabetes, heart disease, obesity, and many other diet-fueled chronic ailments. But now, here is a bright beacon of hope…

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Cooking With Qi & Conquering Any Disease

| by Merryn Jose

Like so many of us, I’ve been watching my nutrition and eating healthfully for years, buying only organic and the very freshest ingredients possible. Also years ago, I cut out those foods that are damaging to our systems. I thought I was doing well until I heard about Qigong Master Jeff Primack and his food based healing system.

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Starting Seeds Indoors for Spring Planting

| by Priscilla Warhowsky

Who doesn’t love to walk into the garden and pick a summer ripened juicy tomato to eat off the vine or slice up later with basil and olive oil? It’s almost a rite of summer for gardeners. Many summer vegetables that love heat such as tomatoes, eggplant, and peppers can be started indoors as seeds in late March to mid April to get a head start on the season. Starting seeds indoors is easy, fun, and you get to watch your creation from seed to plant to your dinner plate….

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