Acupressure Exercises for Better Eye Health by Marc Grossman OD, LAc

Acupuncture/acupressure is an ancient system of healing developed over thousands of years as part of the traditional medicine of China, Japan and other Eastern countries. The practice of acupuncture is thought to have begun with the discovery that the stimulation of specific areas on the skin affects the functioning of certain organs of the body, and that there exists currents of energy that flow in distinct patterns throughout the body called meridians. The belief and experience has been that when these currents of energy are flowing smoothly, there is health, when any of these currents are blocked there is pain and disease.

Major Acupressure Eye Points

There are a number of acupuncture/acupressure points around the eyes (basically around the orbits of the eyes which are the bones that surround the eyeballs). The points shown above are some of the major local eye points.

  • 1. Jingming (Bl-1) Urinary Bladder Channel, lies where the inner corner of the eye meets the nose. Bladder 1 and 2 are perhaps the best two points for eye problems of all kinds from early-stage cataracts or glaucoma to hysteria with vision loss. They are also used for problems with conjunctivitis due to Wind-Heat and Liver Heat, to blurred vision in the elderly due to Deficient Jing and Blood
  • 2. Zanzhu (Bl-2) Urinary Bladder Channel, lies in the depressions at the inner ends of the eyebrows. See Bladder 1.
  • 3. Yuyao Midpoint of the eyebrow in the hollow. Good for eye problems related to worry, excessive study and mental strain.
  • 4. Sizhukong (T.B. 23) Sanjiao or Triple Burner Channel, in the depression at the outside end of the eyebrow. This is a local point good for eye and facial problems, whether due to Wind invasion or the Liver Yang and Fire.
  • 5. Tongziliao (G.B. 1) Gall Bladder Channel, lies in the cavities on the outside corners of the eye sockets. Good for eye problems including conjunctivitis, red sore eyes, photophobia, dry, itchy eyes, early-stage cataracts and blurred vision, as well as lateral headaches.
  • 6. Qiuhou Midway between St-1 and GB-1 along the orbit of the eyes.
  • 7. Chengqi (St.1) directly blow the pupil on the infraorbital ridge bone. This is a main point for all eye problems, including those due to Wind Cold, Wind Heat and Hyperactive Liver Yang.

Instructions for doing self-accupressure for eye-health

GENTLY massage each acupuncture point around the orbit of the eye, starting with B1-1 and massaging each point as you go up and outward. Each point should be massaged for approximately 5-10 seconds. You can massage both eyes at the same time. You can do this massage as often as you like over the course of the day. You may find that each point feels different in terms of sensitivity.

Keep BREATHING as you massage. Deep breathing helps the cells of your eyes receive the oxygen they need for healing. Practice long, slow abdominal breathing while massaging the acupressure points.

CAUTION: If you are pregnant, consult a trained acupuncturist before treating yourself. Do not massage on an area if it has a scar, burn or infection.

 

Marc Grossman, Doctor of Optometry and New York State Licensed Acupuncturist is author of several books, including Natural Eye Care – Your Guide to Healthy Vision.  Since 1980 Dr. Marc Grossman has helped many people maintain healthy vision and even improve eyesight. He is best described as a Holistic Eye Doctor, dedicated to helping people with such conditions ranging from myopia and dry eyes to potentially vision threatening diseases as macular degeneration and glaucoma. His combined multi-disciplinary approach using nutrition, eye exercises, lifestyle changes and Chinese Medicine provides him with a wide array of tools and approaches to tackle difficult eye problems. Dr. Grossman founded the Rye Learning Center in 1980, a multidisciplinary center for learning problems, in 1996 co-founded Integral Health Associates in New Paltz, New York, and in 1999 co-founded Natural Eye Care, Inc. For more information go to www.naturaleyecare.com or call 845-255-8222.