Research Mapping Emotions Shows Strong Mind-Body Connection

Reprinted with kind permission of WakingTimes.com.

Love makes us warm all over, and now scientists are creating body maps to prove it. A team of scientists in Finland has used a topographical self-reported method to reveal the effects that different emotional states have on bodily sensations. After five experiments and over 700 participants from Finland, Sweden and Taiwan, who reported where on their bodies they felt different emotions, the scientists discovered surprising consistencies. Their research findings were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences:

Most basic emotions were associated with sensations of elevated activity in the upper chest area, likely corresponding to changes in breathing and heart rate (1). Similarly, sensations in the head area were shared across all emotions, reflecting probably both physiological changes in the facial area (i.e., facial musculature activation, skin temperature, lacrimation) as well as the felt changes in the contents of mind triggered by the emotional events. Sensations in the upper limbs were most prominent in approach-oriented emotions, anger and happiness, whereas sensations of decreased limb activity were a defining feature of sadness. Sensations in the digestive system and around the throat region were mainly found in disgust. In contrast with all of the other emotions, happiness was associated with enhanced sensations all over the body.

Research on behavioral and physiological responses to emotions could help in understanding mood disorders such as anxiety and depression.

“Emotions coordinate our behavior and physiological states during survival-salient events and pleasurable interactions. Even though we are often consciously aware of our current emotional state, such as anger or happiness, the mechanisms giving rise to these subjective sensations have remained unresolved. Here we used a topographical self-report tool to reveal that different emotional states are associated with topographically distinct and culturally universal bodily sensations; these sensations could underlie our conscious emotional experiences. Monitoring the topography of emotion-triggered bodily sensations brings forth a unique tool for emotion research and could even provide a biomarker for emotional disorders.”

This research is another great example of the mind and body connection. Our brain sends signals to the body as we deal with certain situations, causing certain physiological changes without any thought on our part. These bodily sensations in turn could be helping the mind to consciously recognize what emotions we are having. This type of research could help explain why making an effort to smile more or sitting straight instead of slouching can alter our brain, improve our mood, and change our general disposition.

“People look at emotions as something in relation to other people,” Antonio Damasio, who is a professor at the University of Southern California, says. “But emotions also have to do with how we deal with the environment – threats and opportunities.” For those, Damasio says, you need your body as well as your mind. (source: NPR)

For the complete article, click here.

Alex Pietrowski is an artist and writer concerned with preserving good health and the basic freedom to enjoy a healthy lifestyle. He is a staff writer for WakingTimes.com and an avid student of Yoga and life.

Credits: WakingTimes

References:PNAS.org , NPR

Image source: Lauri Nummenmaa et. al.


If Plants Are Consciousness, What Happens When We Eat Them?

| by Cheryl Shainmark

Not too long ago The New York Times ran an article, Sedate a Plant, and It Seems to Lose Consciousness. Is It Conscious? The new evidence that plants have a type of “conscious,” joins a host of other research indicating that plants are intelligent, understand where they are in space, respond to threats and obstacles, and communicate with each other. We’ve known for years that plants grow faster and lusher when you play the right music or speak nicely to them, but now there is evidence that plants form memories. Does that mean they remember that you were kind to them? And what does it mean now to eat them? What, if any, are the moral or ethical implications?

Read More.

Remote Viewing: Perceiving Information Non-Locally

Remote viewing (RV) is the practice of seeking impressions about a distant or unseen target using subjective means, in particular, extra-sensory perception (ESP) or “sensing with mind”. While ancient texts and shamanic traditions have emphasized this ability for thousands of years, it is only in the last century that modern science began to take it seriously. Since the 1970’s researchers such as Russell Targ (video) have published data that corroborates perceiving information in non-local ways. In the 1990’s it was popularized with books about US military experiments called “The Stargate Project.”

Read More.

Plants Use Sound Waves to Communicate With Each Other

Plants Use Sound Waves to Communicate With Each Other A new study published last week in BMC Ecology shows that plants can communicate with each other using “nano-mechanical” sound waves. They use these signals to encourage each other to grow, and to keep track of where spatially another plant may need room. The sound vibrations signal the other plant where they are and to grow accordingly.

Read More.

Merlian News Podcast Interview with Dr. Dean Radin: Parts 1 & 2

| by Merlian News

Dr. Dean Radin served as a scientist on a highly classified program investigating psi phenomena for the U.S. government. His book The Conscious Universe won the 1997 Book Award from The Scientific and Medical Network, and it has been translated into eight languages. The majority of Dr. Radin’s professional career has focused on experimentally probing the far reaches of human consciousness, primarily intuition, gut feelings and psi phenomena. Dr. Radin has also appeared in the movie What The Bleep Do We Know?!- Down The Rabbit Hole

Read More.

New Thinking Allowed: Dr. Jeffrey Mishlove & Parapsychology

A few years ago, Jeffrey Mishlove, PhD. restarted his groundbreaking YouTube show with a new name, “New Thinking Allowed” (video). Dr. Mishlove, who ran the original series from 1986 to 2002, interviewed more than 200 leading intellectuals, including Joseph Campbell, Jean Houston, Terence McKenna, Michael Talbot, and more. In his introduction to the new series, he explains his motivation for starting anew, as a desire to “leave a legacy of the best thinking out there for those who desire to understand who they are and what their potential is.”

Read More.

Klaus Heinemann On Orbs & Entities

| by Hazel Courtney

‘If you change your TV channel, you switch to different frequencies, which contain different information. It’s illogical to think that what we cannot see is not real, because the human eye is able to receive only a very narrow part of the light spectrum. Many animals can see in spectrums invisible to us.’.. As Professor Heinemann summarised: ‘Research into orbs is only in its infancy. But the photographs of these spirit emanations offer evidence – as close to scientific proof as we have ever come – in proving the existence of spiritual reality.’

Read More.

UFO Coverage Hits the Mainstream

This week The New York Times reported that two Navy pilots saw “unidentified flying objects” almost daily throughout 2014 into 2015. While the government is not saying that these objects are extraterrestrial in origin, neither do they have an alternative explanation. According to the report, “the objects persisted, showing up at 30,000 feet, 20,000 feet, even sea level. They could accelerate, slow down, and then hit hypersonic speeds.”

Read More.

Increased Hope for Alzheimer’s Patients

As the American population ages and the peak of the baby boomer generation move into their 70s, there has been a huge increase in the number of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Fortunately, there is a growing body of research into cause, early diagnosis and treatment, that shows great promise.

Read More.

Merlian News Podcast Interview with Lynne McTaggart: Part 1

| by Merlian News

In this interview, Lynne McTaggart discusses with Merryn Jose her most recent project, The Intention Experiment, which enables people to actually participate in her ongoing research. Lynne McTaggart is the author of five books, including The Intention Experiment and the international bestseller The Field. She was featured in the wildly successful cult classic movie What The Bleep!? Down The Rabbit Hole , and has become an international spokesperson on alternatives to conventional medicine.

Read More.