Increased Hope for Alzheimer’s Patients

As the American population ages and the peak of the baby boomer generation move into their 70s, there has been a huge increase in the number of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Fortunately, there is a growing body of research into cause, early diagnosis and treatment, that shows great promise.

Recently, the New York Times reported on research indicating that sharp, prolonged changes in mood or behavior may be “A New Harbinger of Alzheimer’s,” possibly predictive of the memory loss and cognitive impairment that we customarily associate with the disease. Since early diagnosis and treatment remain the most effective strategies in limiting progression, any advance warning signs should be taken seriously.

There has even been some indication that Alzheimer’s may be reversible in a small percentage of those diagnosed. In a recent newsletter, Dr. David Perlmutter wrote about a treatment regimen conducted by Dale Bredeson, at the Buck Institute, that includes “reducing blood sugar, increasing physical exercise, lowering homocysteine, optimizing vitamin D and regulating hormones, all of which helped to pave the way for Alzheimer’s patients to regain cognitive function.”

AlzheimersNew drugs are constantly being developed, with varying degrees of success. There is also some indication that the cannabis compounds in marijuana may help to protect those brain cells commonly attacked by the disease. Other research suggests that light therapy may help patients to regain lost memories. There is also some indication that the relaxing and repetitive movements of qigong may reverse some dementia (video). A great resource is Peggy Sarlin’s “Awakening from Alzheimers,” (newly updated for 2016) in which she has compiled research, doctor interviews, natural and holistic treatments and more.  Faced with the certainty that incidences of Alzheimers are going to skyrocket over the next decade as boomers age up, researchers are exploring every possibility.

 


Merlian News Podcast Interview with Lynne McTaggart: Part 1

| by Merlian News

In this interview, Lynne McTaggart discusses with Merryn Jose her most recent project, The Intention Experiment, which enables people to actually participate in her ongoing research. Lynne McTaggart is the author of five books, including The Intention Experiment and the international bestseller The Field. She was featured in the wildly successful cult classic movie What The Bleep!? Down The Rabbit Hole , and has become an international spokesperson on alternatives to conventional medicine.

Read More.

How Clean Is Your Biofield? Recognizing and eliminating EMF in your environment

| by Merlian News

There has been a great deal of research in the last several years about the impact of electrical, cellular, microwave and other energies on the human body. Our electromagnetic fields or EMF, also known as our biofield, can be affected or disrupted by the electrical signals or radiation emited by such common devices as cell phones, computers and electrical lines. Detecting unwanted radiation and eliminating it has become a new focus for those concerned with their health.

Read More.

Research Mapping Emotions Shows Strong Mind-Body Connection

Love makes us warm all over, and now scientists are creating body maps to prove it. A team of scientists in Finland has used a topographical self-reported method to reveal the effects that different emotional states have on bodily sensations. After five experiments and over 700 participants from Finland, Sweden and Taiwan, who reported where on their bodies they felt different emotions , the scientists discovered surprising consistencies. Their research findings were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Read More.

The Science Is In: Meditation Affects Aging and Telomere Length

Science is all about precision, controlled studies, and measurable, repeatable results. So for years researchers resisted working on alternative practices such as meditation, dismissing the few studies done as “fuzzy science,” “subjective,” or “impossible to duplicate.” But as research methods have advanced, so has the accuracy of the latest research. There is ample evidence now that stress leads to increased risk of health problems and that meditation reduces stress. What’s new are the studies showing how stress is related to aging and telomere length.

Read More.

Dowsing the Conscious Cosmos by Tim Walter

Tim Walter writes on www.knightsrose.com: Dowsing seems to be the easiest way to literally access part of the quantum layer of existence in our realities. The picture here was taken by NASA astronauts Scott Kelly and Tim Peake from the space station in January 2016. Most of us aren’t lucky enough to witness the amazing visual display of the aurora during our lives let alone such a dramatic display from such a remarkable viewpoint. It’s a heart-stopping and lump-in-the-throat inducing image.

Read More.

Increasing Irisin: How the “Feel Good” Exercise Hormone Can Help Your Brain

Just discovered in 2012, irisin is exciting the science community with questions about its role in our bodies. Named after Iris, the Greek messenger to the gods, it’s called the feel good hormone, or the exercise hormone. As reported recently in The New York Times, research with mice has shown that irisin, released during exercise, works to activate brain cell growth and may counteract the beta amyloid growth associated with Alzheimer’s disease. And while there is plenty of research showing that exercise increases bone density, new studies indicate that it may be irisin that is driving the change. This could lead to new advances in the treatment of osteoporosis.

Read More.

Stalking the Wild Pendulum, by Itzhak Bentov

Bentov says: “I am attempting in this book to build a model of the universe that will satisfy the need for a comprehensive picture of ‘what our existence is all about.’….Referring to psychic phenomena, he says that he will try to explain the underlying mechanisms and explain how they may work.

Read More.

The Man Who Knew Infinity: Srinivasa Ramanujan, Intuitive Mathematician

The Man Who Knew Infinity is the remarkable story of Srinivasa Ramanujan, a brilliant Indian mathematician whose revolutionary ideas took Europe by storm during the years around World War I. The film, released in 2015, stars Dev Patel and Jeremy Irons, and is based on the book of the same name by Robert Kanigel. What made Ramanujan so amazing, were his deeply spiritual and intuitive leaps in fields for which he had no prior background. What made Ramanujan so amazing, were his deep spiritualty and intuitive leaps in fields for which he had no prior background. Ramanujan said that his insights came to him in dreams, which he quickly wrote down upon awakening.

Read More.

Meditation, Spirituality & Brain Changes with Dr. Andrew Newberg

You’ve probably heard of Dr. Andrew Newberg’s work on meditation, even if you didn’t realize it — he’s the scientist who did the ground breaking studies of Tibetan monks meditating that showed how dramatically it changed the brain . He went on to study nuns praying and Sikhs chanting and found similar brain states as those of meditation. His ground breaking work led to the development of a new field of science called “neurotheology,” which studies the relationship between the brain and religious experience.

Read More.