How to Break a Dream Drought By Robert Moss

Have you lost touch with your dreams? Is your dream recall limited to fragments that fade away as you hurry off into the business and traffic of the day? Relax. Here are some fun and easy ways to renew and refresh your relationship with your dreams:

1. Set an intention for the night. Before sleep, write down an intention for the hours of dream and twilight that lie ahead. This can be a travel plan (“I would like to go to Hawaii” or “I would like to visit my girlfriend/boyfriend”). It might be a specific request for guidance (“I want to know what will happen if I change my job”). It could be a more general setting of direction (“I ask for healing” or “I open myself to my creative source”). You might simply say, “I want to have fun in my dreams and remember.”

Make sure your intention has some juice. Don’t make dream recall one more chore to fit in with all the others.

If you like, you can make a little ritual of dream incubation, a simple version of what ancient seekers did when they traveled to temples of dream healing like those of Asklepios in hopes of a night encounter with a sacred guide. You can take a special bath or shower, play a recording of the sounds of nature or running water, and meditate for a while on an object or picture that relates to your intention. You might want to avoid eating heavily or drinking alcohol within a couple of hours of sleep. You could get yourself a little mugwort pillow – in folk tradition, mugwort is an excellent dreambringer – and place it under or near your regular pillow.

2. Be ready to receive. Having set your intention, make sure you have the means to honor it. Keep pen and paper (or a voice recorder) next to your bed so you are ready to record when you wake up. Record something whenever you wake up, even if it’s at 3 a.m. If you have to go to the bathroom, take your notebook with you and practice doing two things at once. Sometimes the dreams we most need to hear come visiting at rather anti-social hours, from the viewpoint of the little everyday mind.

3. Be kind to fragments. Don’t give up on fragments from your night dreams. The wispiest trace of a dream can be exciting to play with, and as you play with it you may find you are pulling back more of the previously forgotten dream. The odd word or phrase left over from a dream may be an intriguing clue, if you are willing to do a little detective work.

Suppose you wake with nothing more than the sense of a certain color. It could be quite interesting to notice that today is a Red Day, or a Green Day, to dress accordingly, to allow the energy of that color to travel with you, and to meditate on the qualities of red or green and see what life memories that evokes.

4. Still no dream recall? No worries. If you don’t remember a dream when you first wake up, laze in bed for a few minutes and see if something comes back. Wiggle around in the bed. Sometimes returning to the body posture we were in earlier in the night helps to bring back what we were dreaming when our bodies were arranged that way.

If you still don’t have a dream, write something down anyway: whatever is in your awareness, including feelings and physical sensations. You are catching the residue of a dream even if the dream itself is gone. As you do this, you are saying to the source of your dreams, “I’m listening. Talk to me.”

You may find that, though your dreams have flown, you have a sense of clarity and direction that is the legacy of the night. We solve problems in our sleep even when we don’t remember the problem-solving process that went on in our dreaming minds.

5. Remember you don’t need to go to sleep in order to dream. Active Dreaming by Robert MossThe incidents of everyday life will speak to us like dream symbols if we will are willing to pay attention. Keep a lookout for the first unusual or striking thing that enters your field of perception in the course of the day and ask whether there could be a message there. Sometimes it’s in your face, as happened to a woman I know who was mourning the end of a romance but had to laugh when she noticed that the bumper sticker of the red convertible in front of her said, “I use ex-lovers as speed bumps.” After this incident, she had started recalling dreams again, and had several to share in the new class. She had dreamed she was in Washington DC, at a conference on transportation. As we explored this dream, she revealed that she had a friend in Washington and that her current work mostly consisted of arranging conferences. “But I know nothing about transportation – except maybe how to drive the wrong way down a one-way street.”

When we start paying attention to the dreamlike symbols of the day, we often reopen our connection to the dreams of the night.

Based on the book Active Dreaming. Copyright 2011 by Robert Moss. Reprinted with permission of New World Library, Novato, CA. www.newworldlibrary.com or 800/972-6657 ext. 52.

For more information, please visit www.mossdreams.com

The Three “Only” Things — tapping the power of Dreams, Coincidence & Imagination by Robert MossMerlian News Podcasts with Robert Moss on The Secret History of Dreaming

Robert Moss Podcasts with Merlian News!

Merlian News Welcomes Back Robert Moss For A Second Podcast Interview

Merlian News Podcast Interviews Robert Moss On His Most Recent Book

Merlian News Podcasts with Robert Moss About Coincidences & Synchronicities


Dreaming with Jung by Robert Moss

The night of my birthday in 1988. I entered the rooms of a tailor in Manhattan. I wanted to have a new suit made but did not like the fabrics he had in stock. When I left the tailor’s shop, the city was different. There was the sense that hidden things were pulsing behind the scenes. Still bent on new clothes, I entered the menswear section of an upscale department store. I pulled a suit off the rack. It fitted perfectly and the price was right. It seemed to have pinstripes. When I looked at the label, it read “Shamanic.”

Read More.
Filed Under:

Mysterious Realities by Robert Moss

| by Cheryl Shainmark

I have enjoyed and benefited from all of Robert Moss’ books over the years, but Mysterious Realities may be my new favorite. This collection of “just so stories,” as the author calls it, is fresh, intimate, and surprisingly topical. If you’re like me and find these current times murky, dense, and difficult to navigate, you need this book.

Read More.
Filed Under: · ·

Reports from the Other Side: Geraldine Cummins and F.W.H. Myers by Robert Moss

| by Robert Moss

“She came from the same Anglo-Irish milieu as William Butler Yeats, and wrote two plays that were performed at his beloved Abbey Theatre. Her mentor was the famous Irish medium Hester Dowden, said to have been the model for the psychic in Yeats’ spirited one-act play The Words Upon the Window-Pane. When she started practicing as a psychic medium, Yeats was one of the first people to consult her. Her name was Geraldine Cummins, and her life story as author, suffragette, medium and possible secret agent during World War II, is quite fascinating.”

Read More.
Filed Under: ·

Merlian News Podcasts with Robert Moss About Coincidences & Synchronicities

| by Merlian News

Robert Moss, a lifelong dream explorer who survived three near-death experiences in childhood. He is the creator of Active Dreaming, an original synthesis of dreamwork and shamanic techniques for empowerment and healing. He is a former university professor of ancient history at the Australian National University, also a bestselling novelist, shamanic counselor, and the author of five books on dreaming. Robert gives lectures and leads workshops all over the world. You can visit his website at www.mossdreams.com.

Read More.
Filed Under:

Action This Day: A Dreamer’s Wish For the New Year

Robert Moss writes, “I have just received the best ever dreamer’s wish for the New Year. It comes from Virginie Pols, a wonderfully gifted dreamer, artist and teacher of Active Dreaming in Switzerland. She offers it in both French and English: Que cette année, nous soyons dignes de nos plus grands reves! This year, may we be worthy of our biggest dreams! I love this because it reminds us that dreams require action. If we do not take action to honor and embody our biggest dreams in our lives, they may fly away. To lose a big dream is a sad thing. It can even amount to losing a vital piece of our soul…”

Read More.
Filed Under: