Dreaming In Foreign Languages by Robert Moss

Earth by www.icicp.orgDreams prompt us to expand our vocabulary, setting us learning tasks ranging from the language of quantum physics to the identification of different types of hermit crab. Even if we decide not to take more than a few steps in some of these journeys of learning and remembering, our ability to decode an initially mysterious word or symbol sometimes provides important objective confirmation that we are dreaming into transpersonal and/or ancestral territory. Some of the greatest adventures in my own imaginal life, which have sometimes brought me to a watershed in ordinary life, have begun with receiving a phrase in a language that is not my own, and yet is retained with enough accuracy to set a clear path for investigation. When I was in my teens in Australia, one of my dream visitors was a radiant young man who seemed to come from the eastern edge of the Mediterranean and insisted on speaking to me in a difficult vocabulary that I later learned was that of the Neoplatonist philosophers. He insisted that all true knowledge comes through anamnesis which means “remembering” in a special sense: remebering the knowledge that belonged to us, on the level of soul and spirit, before we came into the body. When I moved to a farm in the Hudson Valley of New York twenty years ago, I dreamed of an ancient native woman who insisted on communicating to me in her own laguage. One of the words I wrote down phonetically was ondinnonk. It looked improbable. I discovered that far from being a nonsense word, it was the key to a practice of dreaming and healing that went deeper than anything I had learned from Western psychology. In the spiritual vocabulary of the Huron,ondinnonk meant “the secret wish of the soul”, especially as revealed in dreams. I discovered this in the report of a Jesuit missionary who lived among the Huron in the 16oos. I learned that among the Huron and their Iroquois cousins, dreamwork centered on helping the dreamer to recognize the “secret wish of the soul” as revealed in a dream, and honoring that wish. Seven years ago, I recorded a word of medieval French -chantepleure- that was the legacy of a mostly forgotten dream. I knew enough French to see that it combines the words that mean “sings” and “cries”. A dictionary told me that is is an archaic term for a watering can. I had no context and could not grasp why this word had come through – until three years later through a string of dreams, visions and synchronicities, I found myself drawn into the world of Joan of Arc and Charles d’Orleans, the prince in whose name she launched her warrior crusade. I discovered that achantepleure dripping blood was chosen by Charles’ mother as the family emblem, signifying grief and the demand for justice, after his father, the first Duke of Orleans, was slaughtered by ax-murders employed by the Duke of Burgundy.

“World in Your Hands” image from Department of World Languages, Cal State University San Bernardino

(c) Robert Moss, All rights reserved.

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http://blog.beliefnet.com/dreamgates

Youtube- Present! – Dreaming with Robert Moss (part one)

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Why You Want To Keep A Journal by Robert Moss

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Opening The Dream Door For Others, To Communion of Spirits by Robert Moss

| by Robert Moss

When we open the dream door for others, it can lead to a true communion of spirits. To play dream guide for another person, we need to know how to create a safe space where someone new to dream sharing can be helped to tell a dream, enter into a simple and focused discussion of that dream, receive helpful feedback and then be encouraged to take action to honor the dream and bring its energy into everyday life. I have invented a process that enables us to play dream guide in this way in just a few minutes. I call it the Lightning Dreamwork process, because it is meant to be quick, like lightning, and to focus energy, like a lightning bolt. The process is explained in several of my books, including The Three “Only” Things…”

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Shamanic Lucid Dreaming by Robert Moss

| by Robert Moss

“Through dreaming, we have access to a source that is infinitely wiser and deeper than the everyday ego, and we want to be available to that source. I am in favor of learning to choose where we go and what we do in dreams, as in waking life, but that requires discernment, not the fantasy of control… the easiest way to become a lucid or conscious dreamer is to start out lucid and stay that way: in other words, to enter conscious dreaming from a waking or semi-wakeful state.

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In The Dream House, There Are Many Mansions by Robert Moss

| by Robert Moss

“The state of a dream house may reflect the state of the body. If the dream house is in need of repairs, or there’s a problem with the plumbing or the furnace, I’ll think about whether there are health advisories here. The dream house may also be the house of the psyche. Different rooms may represent different functions, of body or soul. The kitchen may represent the digestive system, or the state of our family, or of our creativity (since the kitchen is the place where we cook things up and often the hub of family life)…”

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Why You Want To Keep A Journal by Robert Moss

| by Robert Moss

“Indeed, there is nothing too little, or too great, for inclusion in a journal. If you are not already keeping one, I entreat you to start today. Write whatever is passing through your mind, or whatever catches your eye in the passing scene around you. If you remember your dreams, start with them. If you don’t recall your dreams, start with whatever thoughts and feelings are first with you as you enter the day, or that interval between two sleeps the French used to call dorveille (“sleep-wake”), a liminal space when creative ideas often stream through.”

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When Children Dream the Future by Robert Moss

| by Robert Moss

“Children don’t have to be told that we are all psychics in our dreams. They know this, because they have psychic experiences in their dreams all the time. They see into the future, they encounter the departed, they see things happening at a distance and behind doors that are supposedly locked to them. The problem is that very often the adults around them won’t listen, sometimes because they are afraid of what the child may be seeing.”

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Tarot Gate to Atlantis by Robert Moss

| by Robert Moss

Working the Tarot can bring us in contact with past masters of this system. On a fall evening, I had been discussing Tarot and did a personal reading in which the last two cards were the Hanged Man and the High Priestess…”

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Dreamgates – Exploring the Worlds of Soul, Imagination, and Life Beyond Death by Robert Moss

| by Cheryl Shainmark

“Dreamgates may be more of a treasure map than a book — in the world of dream navigation, think “X” marks the spot for one jewel after another. Anything from Robert Moss is good, but this is one of his best. Originally published in 1998, and now newly reissued (by New World Library), Dreamgates is already a classic that rewards re-reading and greater study.”

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No Nonsense Advice Direct From The Dream World by Megan McFeely

| by Megan McFeely

“I have what I call dreams and then what I call dream experiences. In dreams I feel this sense of something more ethereal, where I am bit removed, more of an observer in the process. With experiences, I feel like I am engaged in the action — there is something really happening and I am participating. Sometimes I can even use my mind to influence the events as they unfold, which is really amazing.”

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To a Boy Who Found Out It Wasn’t Santa Who Brought the Presents by Robert Moss

I remembered a conversation in which I suggested that the original Santa was a shaman of the Sami, a reindeer-herding people of Lapland, reputed to have the power to call up the winds and fly through the air, and that the reason his coat is red is that it was the flayed skin of a reindeer. I have seen Sami drums with images of a shaman flying through the three tiers of the shamanic cosmos on a sleigh pulled by reindeer. But while there is a rich ethnography on Sami shamanism, I could think of no source that would be suitable for a young boy. So I took on the assignment of writing my own version of the first Santa, addressed to a boy in danger of losing his belief in Christmas magic.

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