Summer Green Bean Saute from Priscilla Warshowsky

This is a quick and simple side dish to make for warm summer evenings, as it only requires the briefest time on the stove top. Even better, there’s no need to stress about measuring ingredients – you can let the daily harvest from your home garden, or your local farmer’s market be your guide, as well as the number of people you expect to feed. Likewise, you can adjust the basic recipe to your own tastes. Any leftovers can be reheated, served cold, or at room temperature – you can even add some sliced, fresh tomatoes, and toss it with your favorite vinaigrette to turn it into a summer salad!

Ingredients:

  • Green Beans (amount depends on number of people being served)
  • Ghee, olive oil, or Macadamia Nut Buttery Spread*
  • Shallots, sliced into rings
  • Crushed hazelnuts
  • One zucchini, or summer squash, diced
  • Mixture of finely chopped summer herbs, such as basil, oregano, and thyme

Optional: Vegetable broth or water, as needed

 

Preparation:

Put the oil in a pan and heat over low heat.

Add the shallots, and cook until soft.

Add the beans, zucchini or squash, and crushed hazelnuts.

Turn the veggies as they cook. If they stick a little, add a small amount of vegetable broth, or water.

Remove from the pan when they reach the desired firmness.

Sprinkle with the herbs and serve.

 

* Macadamia Nut Buttery Spread may be found in the refrigerator section of your store

 

Priscilla Warshowsky, Dr. Warshowsky’s wife, is a Certified Holistic Health Counselor. She works in Dr. Warshowsky’s office, helping patients create a healthy diet, cope with food allergies, cook simple and healthful meals for their families, and advise on nutritional questions. She is also a Certified Master Gardener and often cooks what she grows for her family. She has been a vegetarian for over 45 years. Prior to her career as a Health Counselor, Priscilla was a high school English teacher and an SAT tutor, something she still enjoys doing. She and Dr. Warshowsky enjoy spending time with their family, their three cats, and taking long walks.

 

 


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