Using Infusions to Heal

If you drink coffee, tea, or iced tea then you’re already familiar with the power of infusions to pack in flavors, caffeine or medicinal components. According to www.wikipedia.org:

“Infusion is the process of extracting chemical compounds or flavors from plant material in a solvent such as water, oil or alcohol, by allowing the material to remain suspended in the solvent over time (a process often called steeping ). An infusion is also the name for the resultant liquid…. A common example of an infusion is tea , and many herbal teas are prepared in the same way. Lemon, chamomile, senna, apple, ginger, rooibos , and a great many other plants are used individually or in combination. Herbal infusions in water and oil are both commonly used as herbal remedies. Coffee can also be made through infusion (as in a French press ), but is more often made through percolation.”

What you may not know is that herbal and medicinal teas may provide much more of their active compounds when allowed to steep for several hours or overnight. On her website, www.susunweed.com, Master Herbalist Susun Weed has written extensively about the use of infusions to augment or replace drugs for a variety of complaints. Among her “go to” favorite herbs are:

Chick weed – increase our ability to absorb nutrients, especially minerals. Used to dissolve and break down unwanted matter, including disease-causing bacteria, cysts, benign tumors, thickened mucus in the respiratory and digestive systems, and excess fat cells. Red clover — powerful anti-cancer agent, used for menopause relief, treating coughs, and more. Stinging Nettles — a diuretic, loaded with calcium, used to prevent osteoporosis, purify the blood and treat prostrate issues Oat straw — used to treat anxiety and stress, also known as a natural “Viagra.”

Learn more with this video interview with Susun Weed


A Year Milestone for the Unlikely Vegan by Phil Shainmark

| by Phil Shainmark

What a year it’s been – or pretty close to a year. I’m not 100% sure I can nail down a solid date. But we’ll call it a year. This Vegan thing has certainly been an adjustment, but now I don’t even think twice about it. And as I go out and do more and more things, I continuously think to myself, “Gods, I’m glad I don’t eat that stuff anymore.” I’ve been to a few new (for me) Vegan restaurants in town. One was VegeNation (S. Eastern Ave. Henderson, NV). The staff were awesome and the food was excellent. I had cauliflower buffalo wings, which I always thought was ridiculous, but it was really tasty.

Read More.

Synergize and Thrive

| by Rachel Mazzei

Hi – for anyone who knows or does not know our story…we are here to tell you how we got here and why we created Synergize and Thrive Health Coaching. We all have unique stories and journeys we travel, but we feel ours is a bit different. We are just small town girls from the same town that were born on the same day. We always had a mirroring effect towards one another growing up and did not realize how similar we were until we were much older. We just “balanced” each other out…

Read More.
Filed Under:

Eat Healthy Fats for a Healthy Brain by Allan Warshowsky, MD, FACOG, ABIHM

| by Allan Warshowsky, MD, FACOG, ABIHM

There has been much controversy about which fats to include in a healthy diet that would help is to avoid or reduce the chances of developing one of the chronic diseases of aging. These would include diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancers, osteoarthritic conditions, autoimmune disease, cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s disease is primarily the result of increased brain inflammation. This has been referred to as “the brain on fire.” To maintain our brain health and cognitive abilities, we need to make dietary and other lifestyle choices that will reduce inflammation and put out the fire. Maximizing healthy fats in the diet will optimize brain health.

Read More.

Whole Grains: Millet by Karen Railey

| by Karen Railey

Millet is one of the oldest foods known to humans and possibly the first cereal grain to be used for domestic purposes. It is mentioned in the Bible, and was used during those times to make bread. Millet has been used in Africa and India as a staple food for thousands of years and it was grown as early as 2700 BC in China where it was the prevalent grain before rice became the dominant staple. It is documented that the plant was also grown by the lake dwellers of Switzerland during the Stone Age.

Read More.

The List of Benefits of Curcumin Keeps Growing

| by Merlian News

Curcumin is a naturally occurring compound found in the spice turmeric that has been used for centuries as an Ayurvedic medicine treatment for such ailments as allergies, diabetes and ulcers. To date it is one of the most studied natural compounds in modern medicine. Now curcumin and turmeric have been linked with lowering high cholesterol, acting as a steroid-like anti-inflammatory on arthritis and a variety of immune disorders, preventing Alzheimer’s, and inducing cell death in cancerous cells. From Dr. Andrew Weil to Dr. Joseph Mercola, from Dr. Oz to Deepak Chopra, physicians and dieticians have been recommending curcumin to their patients for years.

Read More.

Dandelions May Help Beat Cancer

Dandelion, both leaves and roots, whether grown wild or cultivated, is full of medicinal benefits. The greens can be chopped into salad, cooked like spinach, or added to juicing, while the root form can be used to make an infusion/tea or extract. Pamela Ovadje, a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Windsor, has done extensive work in investigating the anti-cancer properties of dandelions and other natural extracts. She found that an extract of dandelions can cause apoptosis, or cell death, among cancerous cells while not harming the healthy ones.

Read More.

A Talk with Dominique Antiglio, author of The Life-Changing Power of Sophrology

Dominique Antiglio is the author of The Life Changing Power of Sophrology: Breathe and Connect with the Calm and Happy You. She is a Sophrologist specializing in stress-management, self-development, and birth preparation. Born in Switzerland, Dominique started Sophrology at fifteen years old, learning early ways to positively connect with herself and embrace a new way of living.

Read More.
Filed Under: ·

The Unlikely Vegan Gets His NY Fix by Phil Shainmark

| by Phil Shainmark

So, my brother-in-law Dan and I went to NY, and it was an awesome trip from start to finish. My father picked us up at the airport and took us to Royal Palace in White Plains, NY. I’ve mentioned it before, but it’s worth talking about again. Dan and I were famished, so a buffet was definitely the way to go. We loaded up our plates and went to town. The staff there is so great, asking us what we liked and didn’t like, and talking to us about India and where the foods come from when we expressed an interest. I will go there any time I’m in the area. The next day we went to Long Island to see my grandparents, and go to Town Bagel (I needed my NY bagel fix).

Read More.

What’s Science Got to Do With It? By Susun Weed

Once upon a time, healing was considered an art. Healing was understood by all to be a complex interaction between the patient, the healer, the community of living people, the communities of the plants and animals (and insects and rocks and fish), the communities of the non-living people (such as ancestors, spirit guides, and archetypes) and that mysterious movement known by so many names: Creator, God/dess, All High.

Read More.
Filed Under: